Kindlelife

Insight, Inspiration, Motivation

Burnout – FAQs


In my last post, I answered one important question that physicians often ask, when the question of looking after themselves is brought up.

Another question that was asked of me recently, was this: “OK, so, I recognize that I am burnt out, but it is such work (sic) to get help! When I think of seeing a coach/counsellor, I worry that they are going to give me ‘homework’ and that is added burden to my already burnt-out life! So, I prefer to just go on, hoping that things will get better. Isn’t it better to do that, than to jump into something (coaching) and then halfway across, find that I am treading on thin ice, and then be unable to turn back?”

Quite a poignant point, don’t you think? Well, there are many points raised in this question, which I shall try and address.

The first point is that it is, of course, important to recognize burnout – but what is more important is to figure out, what is it costing you to stay in status quo??? If you are already aware of your situation, then either you are very self-aware, or something is already going wrong, in your life/career. Chances are, based on the question, that the latter is more likely. What is the price you pay, for not fixing the problem? Is it discontent at work, disrupted relationships – with colleagues/family members/friends, lack of time for self, illness-physical or psychological, or is it lack of recreation time, or a lack of well-being? How badly does this affect you, make you unhappy? How badly do you want to change this situation? Once you figure out the value of change, and if that value is big enough, then you will have the motivation to change.

The idea of “hoping that things might get better” is really hoping against hope, if you do nothing about it. You cannot sit on the sidelines of your life, and ‘hope’ for things to get better. It just doesn’t seem to happen, at least, not with any reportable frequency!

As far as coaches giving you ‘homework’, I think the term itself conjures up a very negative emotion! While most coaching sessions end with the client making a commitment to an action towards their stated goal, it is entirely upto the client to decide how they want to get to the goal, and what the reasonable action is, to get there. For example, if a person decides that they want to have a positive attitude at work, a simple step towards this goal would be to become aware of one’s thoughts/speech, at least a few times during the day, and if it is negative, replace it with a positive thought. Writing things down would make this exercise more effective.

This does involve some work, indeed, but if the motivation is to change one’s thought pattern, and if you want it badly enough, then you cannot help noticing your thoughts, and you would not consider this as unpleasant ‘homework’. The only way to change your life is to change something that you are doing – to that extent, there is homework to do. There are habits to change, and this can only happen with conscious action, done repeatedly.

The idea of turning back is interesting. The whole point of starting a new program is to make a significant change for the better in life. People only do this when they feel unhappy enough with their current lives. Any change, however, is a step towards the unknown. It is a step outside your comfort zone. And a person would only do that when their current situation is uncomfortable or unsatisfying. To expect things to e easy is rather naïve. When considering the idea of turning back, the question is – towards what? The same situation you were turning away from in the first place? What good would that do? Most worthwhile successes in this world have happened when people have stuck it out just past the point where they wanted to turn back! So, one can only start knowing fully well that any change is going to cause some discomfort, but it will be worthwhile in the end.

Please send me any questions/suggestions you have, that I can address in future posts.

 

 

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May 28, 2013 Posted by | Personal Journey, Psychology, Self Improvement | , , , , | Leave a comment

Burnout – FAQs


I recently gave a talk at my hospital Grand Rounds, about Burnout, which is one of my favourite topics. There were a few questions asked, which I thought I could try and answer here.

“If I take any time off, what will happen to my patients?”

I would like to clarify that I wasn’t asking people to all take lots of time off, and go away! On the other hand, I suggested that everybody needs rest, and that we should all be sensible about recognizing that need, and taking rest, before we become too fatigued, and forced to rest. If we wait until we have to go, then we will not be able to enjoy such time off. Also, if going away for any length of time is impossible, then make sure that the time that we get every day that we come home after work, be well utilized to recover as completely as possible, from the stresses of the day.

It is very true, especially in community hospitals, that there often is nobody else who shares the care of our patients, normally. We have a great rapport with most of our patients, and the sense of responsibility for their well being is also great. This can lead to a sense of guilt, even at the thought of having to make them wait longer to see us, or worse, having to cancel their appointment, for any reason.

On the other hand, we have a responsibility also to give them our best, when we are with them. If we work ourselves to the point of burnout, then we will surely be unable to feel the compassion that the patients need, and perhaps the good judgment we need in certain situations that call for more involved, critical thinking. This can lead to mistakes, or at the very least, misunderstandings and a loss of trust and that very rapport that we try to maintain, by not missing work!

To look at things from a broader perspective, imagine a freshly dug hole in the ground. At first, the hole will have very sharp banks, but slowly, the soil around it will shift, the edges will look blunt, and eventually, the hole will disappear. How long it takes to fill the hole will depend on how big the hole was, but fill up, it will.

Similarly, if a physician suddenly drops out of the scene – due to illness or (heaven forbid) death, there will be a void at first. The size of that void will depend on how well that physician was thought of. It is probably the physician’s own family who will be the most severely affected – let’s make no mistake about that. However, life will go on. Sooner or later, alternate arrangements will be made, others will move in, and the patients will get taken care of, the work will get done.

It is true that each of us is unique – and nobody will be able to do things exactly as you do it! But people will learn to adjust and even like the way it eventually gets done. That is how they will cope with the change themselves.

So, ultimately, it is in our own interests to not be forced to drop out of our working lives before we are ready to go. Also, we owe it to our patients to give them our best, when we are there, in front of them, giving them our full attention.

I will answer some of the other questions that have been raised, in future posts.

 

 

May 5, 2013 Posted by | Personal Journey, Self Improvement | , , , | Leave a comment

   

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